ISSN 2371-350X

What is a Man’s Worth?

Reuters photo

 

By

Hazel Speed

There will be many who, having read about George Osborne‘s worth for working one day per week will, no doubt, be incensed by the sheer greed and injustice when compared to the average salary for one day’s work in respect of an ordinary man (or woman) in general industries, offices, factories, shops, pensioners, hospitals, home care et al.

Most of us would be too embarrassed to even countenance acceptance of such an immoral amount (regardless of source), and be suspicious as to what was expected in return – also how can such a high amount be found, e.g. what is going on within, etc.

Many think that the football associations are more about big business now than the game of football. Singers and actors, a different talent again, if successful, can soon become millionaires.

Each of the above examples has a different feel but in essence, the same principle applies.

What of ‘potential’ George Osbornes who are currently signing on for unemployment benefits and families that are still living in poverty relying on food banks?

Social care needs generally are reverting back to Victorian comparisons. What makes one person actually worth so much apart from his previous status in the case of George Osborne?

Footballers, singers, dancers, actors, artists, rock groups, singers, and writers enjoy their talent and good luck to them all. However, if they achieve huge commercial success then that, in turn, attracts all sorts of further opportunities not available unless, or until commercial success has been achieved or realised in some way.

Even then, many of those categories in the creative industries remember their early struggles and give back to society in one form or another – some have become successful politicians.

One will see the tangible worth of the constituent elements of a human being (and sadly, we know that legal and/or illegal harvesting and transplanting of purchased organs is another more serious matter in itself).

I would have liked to introduce Mr Osborne to the homeless gentleman, who had, and may still have, no option but to be a rough sleeper whom I met in London and wrote about in my article ‘To Our Shame‘. Then Mr Osborne could look that poor man in the eye, listen to his sad story, as I did, then Mr Osborne can tell him, in comparison, why he, George Osborne, is worth so much more!

Then again, I would have too much respect – for the homeless man!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazel Speed

Photo (c) Hazel Speed – used by kind permision to Tuck Magazine

Hazel Speed is a Philosopher, Writer, and Artist with various creative projects at differing stages of development. Her flaship project is an animation which has produced a film short: www.thepinkprofessor.com. She has also written an E-novel, ‘Just Suppose…!‘ which is available via the attached link.

Art sites: www.candystoreart.comwww.terrificart.comwww.artbadges.co.uk.

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