Belarus cracks down on journalists and publishers as oppressive new media laws bite

August 13, 2018 Europe , HUMAN RIGHTS , News , OPINION/NEWS

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OHCHR

 

 

A wave of raids and arbitrary arrests targeting independent publishers and journalists in Belarus highlights oppressive new rules against internet media in the country, said the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Belarus, Miklós Haraszti.

 

“This action is aimed at obliterating the remnants of journalistic independence in Belarus, and follows oppressive new laws passed in June against independent internet media,” Haraszti said.

 

On 7 and 8 August, the authorities searched premises and blocked the operation of several independent media outlets, among them the online portal Tut.by, and the only independent news agency in Belarus, BelaPAN.

 

At least 18 journalists were arrested, including the Tut.by Editor-in-Chief, Maryna Zolatava, and journalists Ulyiana Babayed, Hanna Kaltyhina and Halina Ulasik. Belapan reporter Tatsyana Karavyanka was also detained. Employees of the media outlets were denied access to their offices.

 

The searches and arrests were prompted by an alleged violation of the Penal Code, which criminalises illegal access to computer information which may cause significant harm. The new rules introduce liability for not obtaining state licences for any web activities, and not identifying all users, including those on social media.

 

“What we are seeing is the sadly customary bogus criminalization of independent journalists. This may simply be a case of journalists occasionally using each other’s passwords to access the news service of the State-owned BelTA news agency.

 

“The allegation of ‘significant harm’ is disingenuous, given that BelTA is amply financed by taxpayers and not even a fraction of its revenues comes from subscriptions,” the Special Rapporteur said.

 

Haraszti expressed particular concern about the arrest of Ms. Karavyanka, who has regularly reported on the Special Rapporteur’s own findings, and has closely followed the concerns of UN human rights mechanisms regarding the situation in Belarus.

 

“Silencing the last resources enabling Belarusians to learn about the UN’s human rights concerns is especially egregious given the Government’s claim of cooperation with the UN,” Haraszti said.

 

“It is also a blatant violation of the country’s obligation not to oppress its citizens for cooperating with the UN.

 

“In the sixth year of my mandate, the human rights situation in Belarus is actually getting worse. International vigilance must now be extended to the fate of those who keep the public informed,” Haraszti concluded.

 

 

 

 

OHCHR

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world’s commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. We have a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

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