Poetry

September 27, 2018 Poetry , POETRY / FICTION

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By

Pranab Ghosh

 

 

 

They Are… But They Are Not

 

 

They are there

Out of the purview

Of life.

 

Like pestilence

They hug

Death, decay

 

They are there

Out of Man’s reach

In another world.

 

They are there

Out of sync

With creation

 

They are the

Destroyer of

All that is humane

 

They are the desire

Of the dead souls

They are the demi gods

Or are they the perishing existence

Of life renewed

Without a mission?

 

They are… They are not…

What they appear to be…

They are passing breeze

Fleeting moments

That do not exist.

 

They are… They have

Always been non-existent.

 

 

 

 

 

Disappearing Civilisation

 

 

Time desirous of change

Fails and ends up

Upholding constancy.

 

Time desirous of unraveling

The mysterious

Shifts in memory of the dead

Exposing the rot

In human soul.

 

Time calling the industrious,

To build a memory

Of Man’s existence

Ends in searching

For a soul that

Never existed.

 

Man stands confounded,

Pedestal of existence

Removed from his feet.

 

The earth moves away

Exposing craters of

Hollow civilization

With Man and

His woman

Disappearing in it.

 

 

 

 

 

Pranab Ghosh

Pranab Ghosh is a journalist, poet, author and translator. He has three published books to his credit. Air and Age (co-author; published from Kolkata), Soul Searching and Other Poems (first solo book of poems, published from Toronto) and Bougainvillea And Other Stories, a book of short stories in English, translated from the Bengali original. His poems have been published in Tuck Magazine, Dissident Voice, Literature Studio Review, Scarlet Leaf Review, Leaves of Ink, Weasel Press, Ochebooks.com, Harbinger Asylum, Hans India and Setu Magazine, among others. He is married and at present is staying in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Editor review

2 Comments

  1. Sarah Ito November 14, at 18:40

    Pranab Ghosh continues to write in his signature bare bones style, leaving much, and little, to the imagination. No small feat, indeed. His linear, line by line assessment of the human condition, both seen and unseen, is quite accurate in its metaphysical view and yet remains readable and enjoyable.

    Reply

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