The Arab World: What Went Wrong

Karam Al-Masri/AFP

 

By

Sami Jamil Jadallah

In order for the Arab world to catch up with the rest of the world, not in buying weapons or engaging in more wars (27 wars among Arabs only and counting), but to catch up in education, science, technology, vocational training, job training, employment and rights of citizenship, it must stop blaming its failures on “colonialism”, “Zionism” or “American Imperialism”, and instead address the social, educational, political, economic, military, security and religious institutions that contributed to such failings.

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African unity and the post colonial instability of African states

Kenny Katombe/Reuters

 

By

Ogunniyi Abayomi

The declaration of India as an independent state on the 15th of August 1947 enacted the struggle and movement of independence across African states.

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Cecil Rhodes must fall, but Mahatma Gandhi must stand – two statues and two controversies

Rodger Bosch/AFP

 

By

Rupen Savoulian

In October of this year, a statue of Mahatma Gandhi was removed from the grounds of the University of Ghana, only a few months after it had been erected there as a presentation from the visiting Indian President, Pranab Mukherjee.

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Islamic Liberation Theology, Why Not?

Susan Baaghil/Reuters

 

By

Sami Jamil Jadallah

If anyone thinks that the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) was not a social and theological liberation revolutionary, they had better think twice.

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Unity in Diversity?

Israel Ophori

 

By

David Adejumo

It can be said that Nigeria has been in a vicious cycle of tribalism, nepotism, ethnicity, religious chauvinism and sentimentalism after over 100 years when the Entity called Nigeria was formed, although there were both negative and positive motives to the so called amalgamation which will be discussed later. I however have a dissenting opinion to the unity of the Entity called Nigeria.

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Early African Historians’ Writings Before 1945: Precursors of Modern African Historiography

By

Durodola Tosin

This essay intends to examine the ways by which the early African historians’ writings before 1945 could be considered precursors of modern African historiography. We examine four early African historians – Carl Reindorf of Ghana, Sir Apolo Kagwa of Uganda, Jacob Egharevba of Benin and Samuel Johnson of Nigeria, their works, writings and contributions to African historiography.

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Please don’t call me ‘Third World’

By

Joe Khamisi 

I get furiously disgusted when I hear people using the term “Third World” in reference to poor, less developed countries like mine. This is a term peddled loosely by toms, dicks, and harrys in the so-called “developed” countries to despise, insult, and degrade young nations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, that are struggling to catch up with today’s high-tech world.

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