ISSN 2371-350X

Posts Tagged ‘Freedom of Speech’

Hateful, toxic rhetoric creating a dangerous and divided world

Mario Tama/AFP   By Amnesty International Politicians using toxic rhetoric, reminiscent of the 1930s, are creating a dangerous and divided world, said human rights NGO Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world.

Civil Society in Thailand under attack as Authorities criminalize dissent

AFP photo   By Amnesty International Thai authorities are waging a campaign to criminalize and punish dissent by targeting civil society and political activists who peacefully exercise their rights to freedom of expression and assembly, a new briefing from human rights NGO Amnesty International has stated.

Media, Activists and the violent narrative

Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters   By Prince Charles Dickson In recent times the Nigerian news media and social media feeds are bombarded with images of spectacular extremist violence and increasingly aggressive and bellicose rhetoric from politicians and pundits. This coverage warrants a close look, as public discourse sinks to new lows in justifying violence against entire racial […]

Observations of an Expat: I am a Liberal

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters   By Tom Arms The Brexiteering Trump supporter narrowed his eyes, curled his upper lip, glared at me and sneeringly stuttered: “You…you…LIBERAL.”

Missing Nation

Fareed Khan/AP   By Imad Zafar ‘Hang the blasphemers, kill them, stone them to death,’ these are the slogans that are being used these days on social media and heard in public and private conversations. Since the bloggers and activists went missing, even scholars and anchors from the mainstream media are also demanding the death […]

Manila residents speak out about Duterte’s war on drugs

Ezra Acayan/Reuters   By Ezra Acayan Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte completes six months in charge today, with the rising death toll from his war on drugs showing no sign of easing.

No peace for journalists in Iraq

Karim Kadim/AP   By Rafah Al Saad I am calling for the freedom of the Iraqi journalist Afrah Shawqi al-Qaisi.

Business as usual for Sri Lanka’s double faced and dying good governance

Maithripala Sirisena/Reuters   By Thambu Kanagasabai With the support of 6.2 million people the present Sri Lankan Government swept to victories at both the Presidential and general elections on the slogan of ‘Good Governance’, to remove the ‘Bad Governance’ of former President Mahinda Rajapaksa who was hailed as a ‘War Hero’ after defeating the ‘Do […]

Free Speech?

By Hazel Speed We are blessed, in the main, that we still have a ‘controlled measure’ of free speech in the UK.

Is Absolute Democracy A Danger To Society?

Reuters photo   By Joe Khamisi Democracy, said the former US President Ronald Reagan, is worth dying for, because it’s a deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man.

Journalism is not a crime

JFO photo   By Rafah Al Saad Each year the second day of November marks the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes against Journalists.

Stagnate or evolve

AFP photo   By Shahper Hassan   A state where citizens have no rights and where others interfere in your life and your privacy is breached is not a state, it’s a joke.   Societies either stagnate or they evolve and they (societies) cannot evolve if citizens are kept ignorant and illiterate, not knowing about […]

Editorial – A few necessary and important words

By Michael Organ Given the daily political tumult around the world and a certain circus in the United States, it is again time and necessary to state Tuck Magazine’s position amidst the madness.

Poetry

David Ould   By Michael Marrotti

Iranan writer faces 6 years for her unpublished fictional story about stoning

By Amnesty International The Iranian authorities must immediately repeal the conviction and sentence of Golrokh Ebrahimi Iraee, a writer and human rights activist who is due to begin serving a six-year sentence for charges including “insulting Islamic sanctities” because she wrote an unpublished fictional story about stoning, Amnesty International have stated.

Office of Missing Persons, Sri Lanka: Upholding or Denying Justice?

Lakruwan Wanniarachchilakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP   By Thambu Kanagasabai Sri Lanka ranks second in the list of countries after Iraq to record the largest number of disappearances with unofficial estimated numbers of about 90,000 since the 1980s. From these disappearances, enforced or involuntary disappearances are reported to be around 65,000.

Congo death toll hits 44 in anti Kabila unrest

Kenny Katombe/Reuters   By Kenny Katombe and Benoit Nyemba At least 44 people – including 37 demonstrators and six police officers – have been killed in protests over Congolese President Joseph Kabila‘s perceived bid to extend his rule, Human Rights Watch (HRW) stated.

Obama should pardon Edward Snowden before he leaves office

Frederick Florin/AFP   By Amnesty International   ‘It will be a deep stain on President Obama’s legacy if he leaves office with Snowden still in exile in Russia’ – Salil Shetty The UK Government should ‘drop plans for new snooping laws which would extend the intrusive and unchallengeable powers of the intelligence services’.

Tanzania’s Magufuli must abandon isolationism and join the rest of the world

Emmanuel Herman/Reuters   By Joe Khamisi Almost a year after Pombe Magufuli took over leadership, questions are arising as to where he is taking Tanzania, one the most respected countries in Africa.

Ugandan police summon journalist over facebook post

By Robert Ssewankambo Police in the Moroto District of North Eastern Uganda summoned a freelance journalist, Teba Arukol, over a Facebook post about the Karamojong cultural leaders.

Beijing warns Hong Kong radicals over calls for independence

Bobby Yip/Reuters   By Venus Wu and James Pomfret Several pro-independence candidates won seats in Hong Kong’s first major election since pro-democracy protests in 2014, prompting a robust warning from China that any independence would damage the city’s security and prosperity.

Ugandan journalist assaulted at court for covering land case

By Robert Ssewankambo Madinah Sebyala, of Bukedde Paper was on 31st August 2016 assaulted by one Kasagga Swaibu who further threatened to inflict her with more harm if she continues to cover a land case where he accuses Kenneth Mukiibi of selling to him land and failing to offer the land title.

Nigerian Police release me after giving them 1000 naira

Tony Karumba/AFP   By Ebi Robert It was indeed a funny experience in the hands of the Nigerian police on 29 August 2016. I had just finished a visit to a friend’s place and was going home in a tricircle, aka Kene, when I was stoped by the Nigerian police in Yenagoa, close to Aritalin […]

Iranian women’s rights activists treated as ‘enemies of the state’ in renewed crackdown

By Amnesty International The Iranian authorities have intensified their repression of women’s rights activists in the country in the past six months carrying out a series of harsh interrogations accusing activists of being “spies” who seek the “overthrow” of the government.

Dozens killed in Ethiopia as police use excessive force against peaceful protesters

Reuters photo   By Amnesty International At least 97 people were killed and hundreds more injured when Ethiopian security forces fired live bullets at peaceful protesters across Oromia region and in parts of Amhara over the weekend, according to credible sources who spoke to human rights NGO Amnesty International.

Turkey: Erdogan’s Unbridled Ambition

AFP photo   By Grégory Wilson  On July 15, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan became the first president in Turkey’s modern history to still be in power after a military coup.

Journalists in Uganda advised not to register with Media Council

Edward Echwalu   By Robert Ssewankambo Journalists in Uganda have been urged not to accept to be licensed by the Media Council because it is illegitimate and pushing for unclear agendas, saying that all such acts are on the wrong side of history.

Poetry

By Michael Marrotti

Listening to a Diasporic British Muslim Woman Writer’s Voice: An Interview with Shelina Janmohamed

By Abu Sufian Writer, columnist and social activist Shelina Zahra Janmohamed was born in 1974 in the UK. She is a British Muslim writer of East-African and South-Asian origin. Janmohamed’s parents emigrated from Tanzania to Britain in 1967. The Guardian describes her as “a commentator on British Islam and Muslim women”.[i]

Philippines: President Duterte must break the cycle of human rights violations

By Amnesty International The Philippines’ new President Rodrigo Duterte must fulfil his inauguration pledge to uphold the country’s commitment to international law and lead a break with the country’s poor human rights record, human rights NGO Amnesty International have stated.