Observations of an Expat: Going Dutch

AFP photo

 

By

Tom Arms

Trump lost on Wednesday. I am not talking about the court ruling on version two of his travel ban. Neither am I talking about the mounting incredulity over his wiretapping claims and tax returns. I am talking about an event that took place 3,843 miles away from the White House on the other side of the Atlantic– the Dutch general election.

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Ruminations on the Austrian Presidential Election – Part Two – After

Matthias Schrader/AP

 

By

Sylvia Petter

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Ruminations on the Austrian Presidential Election – Part One – Before

Heinz-Peter Bader/Reuters

 

By

Sylvia Petter

I’m Australian, I was born in Austria, but can’t vote here. Austria, unlike most Western democracies, does not allow dual nationality, unless of course you’re a Russian opera singer who can’t speak German and only wanted the additional Austrian passport to make travelling easier, or you invest pots of gold and have somehow facilitated some deal in the interests of the country. And those interests depend on who is in charge. So for the time being, I may not be able to vote, but I can still share what I think.

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A Beacon of Justice, Security and Rule of Law: German Chancellor Angela Merkel

Frank Augstein/AP

 

By

Cynthia M. Lardner

German Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel is widely viewed as the most powerful woman not only in the EU but in the world. Today, Ms. Merkel is confronted with widespread criticism primarily from fringe groups in Germany threatening Germany’s long-standing status as being a leader in justice, security and adherence to Rule of Law.

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