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Posts Tagged ‘Hosni Mubarak’

What do Egyptians call their dictator?: El Sisi visits the US

Reuters photo   By Ahmed Tharwat Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi is coming to visit the US in the first week of April. No, this is not an April Fool’s but it is the meeting of fools. The visit is the first official state visit for the Egyptian general at the invitation of President Trump.

The Price of Fear, the Price of Dictatorship

Reuters photo   By Sami Jamil Jadallah   Revisiting the Arab Spring   I grew up when there were curfews that lasted for days, when listening to the wrong radio station could land you in jail, when a stupid, illiterate “security/mokhabarat” could haul you to jail for no reason and I remember when and actually […]

Totalitarian dominance within African Democracy

By Ogunniyi Abayomi The recent Ghanaian election was observed as the exemplary illustration of a democratic state within its sphere of power. The display of maturity during the election between President Mahama over the loss of the presidential seat to Nana Akufo-Addo exhibited the total value demonstrated for the satisfaction of the masses, rather than […]

Castro: From Liberator to Dictator

By Sami Jamil Jadallah America, the great democracy, could never find a dictator it did not like; of course, there are always exceptions to the rules, and the exception is Fidel Castro.

Egypt: Hundreds disappeared and tortured amid wave of brutal repression

AFP photo   By Amnesty International Egypt’s National Security Agency (NSA) is abducting, torturing and forcibly disappearing people in an effort to intimidate opponents and wipe out peaceful dissent, said human rights NGO Amnesty International in a damning new report published today which highlights an unprecedented spike in enforced disappearances since early 2015.

A confidential letter to Mr. Obama

By Muhammad Aladdin Dear Mr. Obama, Well, I do not know how to begin this, or else, I have so many beginnings to such a letter.

Notes From America: The Accidental Hero!!

By Ahmed Tharwat In his book “Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the America Era,” Joseph Nye of Harvard University divided American presidents into two groups.

Tahrir Square and the birth of a Nation

By Ahmed Tharwat This coming Monday will mark the 5th anniversary of the Egyptian revolution that a few days earlier sparked Tunisia. This was the first time in history, where millions of Egyptians marched into the street to claim their country back, and no public place has captured and symbolized this revolution like Tahrir Square.

Grading Obama’s Middle East Strategy – Part One

  By Brian Frydenborg The cocks who crow “failure” every time the sun rises about the Obama Administration’s overall Middle East strategy—and we will be hearing their mindless crowing at its highest decibels since the competition within the Republican Party for the Party’s presidential nomination is now officially underway—have no sense of strategy themselves and dangerously substitute tactical-here-and-nows and […]

Interview with contemporary Artist Asya Eutykh

By Saida Panesh Asya Eutykh is the seamstress of gold and the gunsmith woman-master from Adygea. People justifiably name her ‘Golden-armed’. She is one of the few gunsmith women-masters from Caucasus that reveals the ancient secrets of silver molding, blackening and gilding.

EDUCATIONAL AND ECONOMIC POLICY IN POST ARAB SPRING NATIONS

  By Anant Mishra Many nations in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region have long histories of authoritarian government. In fact, Muslim countries—a category into which many states in this region fall—constituted 55% of the world’s undemocratic nations in 2005.

THE GATEWAY TO THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE EXCHANGE OF ROLES

 By Fadi Elhusseini   After less than a year of exceptional Egyptian-Turkish rapprochement, the events of June 30, 2013 ruptured this relationship. Similarly, when Egyptian and Iranian statesmen began to decrease tensions and a thaw in relations resulted, events evolved to return matters to square one.