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Posts Tagged ‘Thomson Reuters Foundation’

Child marriage soars in Yemen as famine looms

Khaled Abdullah/Reuters   By Emma Batha Child marriage has soared in Yemen as families struggle to feed their children amid a conflict that has left the country on the brink of famine, the U.N. children’s agency stated.

Merkel’s conservatives win Saarland vote in boost for national campaign

Ralph Orlowski/Reuters   By Paul Carrel and Hakan Erdem German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives won a regional election in the western state of Saarland on Sunday, dealing a setback to their Social Democrat rivals and boosting her prospects of winning a fourth term in September’s national election.

YouTube’s bid to grab TV dollars imperiled by advertiser revolt

Dado Ruvic/Reuters   By Julia Love, Jessica Toonkel and Tim Baysinger The decision by a handful of high-profile consumer brands to pull advertising from Google’s YouTube over offensive content could threaten the site’s long-term strategy of stealing ad dollars from television, analysts and ad industry professionals said Thursday.

Five dead, around 40 injured in Parliament ‘terrorist’ attack

Richard Pohle/Reuters   By Toby Melville and William James Five people were killed and about 40 injured in London on Wednesday after a car ploughed into pedestrians and a suspected Islamist-inspired attacker stabbed a policeman close to Britain’s parliament.

Dutch PM Rutte on course for big victory over far-right Wilders

Yves Herman/Reuters   By Thomas Escritt and Toby Sterling The Netherlands’ centre-right Prime Minister Mark Rutte was on course for a resounding victory over anti-Islam and anti-EU Geert Wilders in an election on Wednesday, offering huge relief to other EU governments facing a wave of nationalism.

Dutch poll test of anti-immigrant feeling, Turkish dispute

Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/Reuters   By Philip Blenkinsop The Dutch go to the polls on Wednesday in an election seen as a test of anti-immigrant and nationalist feeling magnified by a deepening dispute with Turkey.

British girls are being sold as child brides like I was, says campaigner

Flora Bartlett/Reuters   By Emma Batha When Gabriella Gillespie was six her father killed her mother; when she was 13 he took her and her sisters to his native Yemen and sold them as child brides.

Growing child labour in India’s cities is just the tip of the iceberg, say activists

Cathal McNaughton/Reuters   By Anuradha Nagaraj Urban India is employing an increasing number of children – many under nine years of age – in producing everything from pickles to fireworks, working in tourism and labouring on building sites, a U.N. children’s agency report and campaigners said.

Women and child migrants raped, beaten and detained in Libyan ‘hellholes’

Daniel Etter/WPPF/Reuters   By Lin Taylor Women and children making the dangerous journey to Europe to flee poverty and conflicts in Africa are being beaten, raped and starved in “living hellholes” in Libya, the United Nations children’s agency (UNICEF) said on Tuesday.

Acrimonious election campaign deepens Northern Ireland deadlock

Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters   By Ian Graham Acrimonious campaigning ahead of Thursday snap elections in Northern Ireland has increased antagonism between pro-British unionists and Irish nationalists and exacerbated fears devolved power may revert to London for the first time in a decade.

Moonlight wins Best Picture Oscar after major onstage gaffe

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters   By Jill Serjeant African-American coming-of-age tale “Moonlight” won the Oscar for best picture on Sunday, beating favourite “La La Land” after an embarrassing onstage gaffe over the announcement.

France’s Macron raises curtain on election alliance to beat Le Pen

Charles Platiau/Reuters   By Brian Love and Michel Rose France’s presidential race took a new turn on Thursday as independent Emmanuel Macron raised the curtain on a partnership with veteran centrist Francois Bayrou to help him beat the far-right’s Marine Le Pen.

Germany’s ‘man of the streets’ Schulz plots path to defeat Merkel

Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters   By Paul Carrel and Holger Hansen His only experience of governing in Germany is as a town mayor. She is Europe’s most powerful leader. Yet Martin Schulz wants to end Angela Merkel’s 11-year run as chancellor and fundamentally shift Germany’s role in Europe. He might just pull it off.

Anti-Islam Wilders frontrunner as Dutch election campaign begins

Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters   By Toby Sterling Campaigning for the Dutch election began on Wednesday with anti-Islam leader Geert Wilders frontrunner in a vote that will test the anti-establishment sentiment that swept Britain out of the European Union and Donald Trump into the U.S. presidency.

In setback for Trump, U.S. judges reject travel ban

David Ryder/Reuters   By Dan Levine and Mica Rosenberg President Donald Trump suffered a legal blow on Thursday when a federal appeals court refused to reinstate his executive order temporarily banning people from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

On the run from Boko Haram, Nigeria’s lost children hope to find families again

Kieran Guilbert/Reuters   By Kieran Guilbert Running his fingers over the wide scars on his knee and thigh, 13-year-old Usman recalled the moment he thought he would die.

Starvation looms for 6 million children in Horn of Africa

Feisal Omar/Reuters   By Katy Migiro Hunger, malnutrition and death threaten 6.5 million children in the impoverished drylands of Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya due to back-to-back droughts, a charity has stated, with spring rains also predicted to be poor.

French police search Fillon office as fraud affair rocks campaign

Pascal Rossignol/Reuters   By Emile Picy and Chine Labbé French police searched presidential candidate Francois Fillon‘s office in parliament on Tuesday as an inquiry into alleged fake work by his wife threatened his campaign and party leaders began to consider a ‘Plan B’ without him.

France’s Fillon and his wife questioned in ‘fake work’ probe

Pascal Rossignol/Reuters   By Chine Labbé and Gérard Bon French conservative presidential candidate Francois Fillon and his wife were questioned for five hours by police investigators on Monday as part of a probe into allegations that Penelope Fillon had been paid for fake jobs.

Parliament must vote before UK can trigger Brexit, top court rules

Stefan Wermuth/Reuters   By Michael Holden and Estelle Shirbon Prime Minister Theresa May must give parliament a vote before she can formally start Britain’s exit from the European Union, the UK Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday, giving lawmakers who oppose her Brexit plans a shot at amending them.

No justice in South Sudan after July rapes and killings

Jok Solomun/Reuters   By Magdalena Mis The United Nations rebuked South Sudan on Monday for failing to pursue justice after grave human rights abuses — including killings and gang rapes — committed during an explosion of violence in the capital Juba in July.

Women farmers in northern India battle tradition, self-doubt to own land

Ajay Verma/Reuters   By Rina Chandran Anjali has worked on the land nearly all her life, first with her tenant-farmer parents, and then alongside her husband in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Trump accuses US spy agencies of Nazi practices over ‘phony’ Russia dossier

Lucas Jackson/Reuters   By Ayesha Rascoe President-elect Donald Trump escalated a fight with U.S. spy agencies on Wednesday, just nine days before he takes over their command as President, and accused them of practices reminiscent of Nazi Germany.

Slum violence inspires Kenyans to tackle huge housing shortage

Goran Tomasevic/Reuters   By Katy Migiro Recently married with a one-year-old child, Joan Moraa Mbogo dreams of escaping Kenya’s noisy, dirty, crime-ridden capital and buying a home close to her mother’s newly-built apartment overlooking the Lukenya Hills.

With crises set to worsen, what are aid groups’ priorities for 2017?

Antonio Parrinello/Reuters   By Umberto Bacchi After a year of record humanitarian needs, 2017 looks set to be even more challenging for aid agencies as they brace for the fallout from protracted conflicts and other escalating crises.

Women’s rights face a daunting new year worldwide, campaigners warn

Kacper Pempel/Reuters   By Ellen Wulfhorst Women’s rights face enormous challenges worldwide in 2017 with campaigners expecting fights to keep health clinics open, to save programs preventing unwanted pregnancies and to enforce laws protecting women from violence.

Manila residents speak out about Duterte’s war on drugs

Ezra Acayan/Reuters   By Ezra Acayan Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte completes six months in charge today, with the rising death toll from his war on drugs showing no sign of easing.

In parting shot at Israel, Kerry warns Middle East peace in jeopardy

Darren Ornitz/Reuters   By Lesley Wroughton and Yeganeh Torbati U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Wednesday said Israel’s building of settlements on occupied land was jeopardizing Middle East peace, voicing unusually frank frustration with America’s longtime ally weeks before he is due to leave office.

Still unbeatable? Truck attack shows Merkel’s vulnerability

Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters   By Noah Barkin For months, Germany’s Angela Merkel has looked like the one safe bet in European politics. As Britain’s David Cameron, Italy’s Matteo Renzi and France’s Francois Hollande all succumbed to the scorn of angry voters, the German chancellor promised to fight for a fourth term and seemed destined to win […]

Russian ambassador shot dead in Ankara gallery

Hasim Kilic/Reuters   By Umit Bektas, Orhan Coskun and Tuvan Gumrukcu The Russian ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, was shot in the back and killed as he gave a speech at an Ankara art gallery on Monday by an off-duty police officer who shouted “Don’t forget Aleppo” and “Allahu Akbar” as he opened fire.