Poetry

April 11, 2018 Poetry , POETRY / FICTION

Reuters photo

 

By

Alejandro Escudé

 

 

 

Raid at Rockefeller Center

 

 

Even Rachel Maddow didn’t know

the dog-eared curtains had blown open

just a few floors below or above her,

files seized by Jupiter-sized men,

scowling men, who were also invisible.

 

A crime the size of a Times Square screen

pulsing between giant shredders

or tiny as a gram of Polonium-210;

Michael Cohen’s office, where one might

request a bathroom key attached

to a block of wood.

 

Such secrets collect beneath Manhattan,

as trains continue their ghostly tour,

gopher-projectiles darting north and south,

passing one another like spoiled lovers

meeting under the frigid heat

of silken sheets.

 

A tip from an eagle-faced man

with granite hands received, as old spies

in old Russia did (under a park bench?)

and off they went to catch a disinfected rat,

to sniff at the corners of the pyramid

—where truth might be revealed.

 

 

 

 

 

Alejandro Escudé

Alejandro Escudé

Alejandro Escudé’s first book of poems, My Earthbound Eye, was published in September 2013. He holds a master’s degree in creative writing from UC Davis and teaches English. Originally from Argentina, Alejandro lives in Los Angeles with his wife and two children.

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