ISSN 2371-350X

Warlords, please leave South Sudan alone!

Camille Lepage

 

By

Joe Khamisi 

If reports from Juba are to be analyzed objectively, South Sudan, dubbed Africa’s youngest nation, may be on the verge of a fresh ethnic conflagration and possible economic collapse.

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Observations of an Expat: Rio and the Paralympics

Martin Rickett/PA

 

By

Tom Arms

A society is judged by its treatment of those less able than the accepted norm. Rio, you have been judged lacking. I am not talking about green diving pools or empty Olympic stadium seats. All those issues pale into insignifcance compared to your plans for the staging of the Paralympics starting on the 7th September.

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Poetry

Eric Kim

 

By

Blanca Alicia Garza

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Self Made Hero

By

Hazel Speed

In general terms graphic novels in former years were not easy on the older eye – the art was too busy but then again they were aimed for the youth of the day, not me.

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Abused and exploited, child migrants in Italy dream of a better life

Magda Mis/Reuters

 

By

Magdalena Mis

Isaac, a 17 year-old from Ghana, holds back tears and looks down as he tries to describe the six months he spent in a Libyan jail where he says not a night would pass without someone dying.

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Nationalisation of the Railways

Nicholas Bailey

 

By

Hazel Speed

It is appreciated that ‘train talk’ in the UK has been quite exhaustive in recent days.

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Poetry

Arun Titan

 

By

Bijay Kumar Show

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CheChe – Ghana’s Next Hip Hop Prodigy

By

Nii Armah Tagoe

It’s no secret that music represents different meanings for many people but one feature that cuts across divided opinions and transcends music genres is ‘Music is the art of the soul’. While many people believe music is food for the soul, the craft and skill musicians employ to make music definitely makes it one of the most artistic vocations in the world. It is for this reason that up and coming artiste, ‘Cheche’ takes so much interest and time in ‘cooking’ the most profound and soul inspiring music.

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Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing

Guang Niu

 

By

Cynthia M. Lardner

Genocide and ethnic cleansing, forms of Scientific Racism, have been around since the beginning of time. Since the Holocaust, various conventions and treaties have been entered into making genocide a crime and ethnic cleansing a crime against humanity. International tribunals have been created, at great expense, to acknowledge the harm done, to redress the wrongs of millions of victims, to provide reparations, and to act as a deterrent. Despite a more concerted international effort, genocide and ethnic cleansing remain endemic global problems.

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Hats Off to John Humphrys

PA photo

 

By

Hazel Speed

BBC Radio 4 ‘The Today Programme’ broadcast an interview with Owen Smith which is a Classic of its Genre, but not for the right reasons as far as Mr. Smith is concerned.

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Poetry

Horst Faas/AP

 

By

Paul Summers

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ActionAid Senegal and Youth Activists celebrate International Youth Day

By

Alpha Jallow

As youths constitutes the greatest portion of society, ActionAid Senegal believes that youth issues are at the heart of concerns of the authorities and community actors. Youth constitutes the largest segment of global society, making an intervention objective becoming a priority for policy makers or for international and national organizations. This formed the basis of International Youth Day earlier this month.

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Ben Hur: A Necessary Remake?

By

Hazel Speed

I will never understand when something has already been established as ‘definitive’, why do yet more versions emerge, be they in the medium of film, TV series, radio or book formats.

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Oxford Street, Ghana and True Religion

Tom Cockrem

 

By

Odinga Adiwu

It’s been a while since I ventured outside the shores of Nigeria, and trust me, it is not like I do that all the time anyway. However, a visit to Ghana, the land of Nkrumah, the land of Kente, and that special Ghanaian jollof rice…the land of the black stars, was one that I was not going to let pass me by.

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Poetry

zvzxv

By

Krista Clark

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Parity – Mugged in a Political Alley

K Wootton

 

By

Hazel Speed

We quite often hear about Parity in ‘this or that’ or between genders and age-groups. Some types of parity will begin in the future, other models of parity may commence soon or immediately, even further forms remain under debate either within the House of Commons or ‘the Other Place’.

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Justice, Security and Rule of Law: International Criminal Law

By

Cynthia M. Lardner

International criminal tribunals have been created to redress the harm done to millions of victims as a result of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, to provide reparations, and to act as a deterrent. Vested with the authority to proceed when nations are unable to effectively adjudicate matters internally and when efforts at diplomacy have failed are the International Criminal Court (ICC), and ad hoc and hybrid courts. The International Court of Justice (ICJ) can handle civil matters brought by one member nation against another. The establishment of these courts is a milestone in the history of mankind.

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Banksy

Banksy

 

By

Hazel Speed

It is ‘a given fact’ we are all intrigued as to who Banksy is and I am even more curious than most for a different reason, but will probably never know the truth.

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Poetry

Lee Friedlander

 

By

Abigail Rathbone

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IARJ, Accra Ghana: Reporting the sacred

Ben Curtis/AP

 

By

Prince Charles Dickson

I recall International Association of Religion Journalists (IARJ) Executive Director Endy Bayuni, who by the way couldn’t make it to Accra, Ghana, asking just before the concluded sixth IARJ conference…Just how big is Africa?

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DNA – Should we be worried

Thierry Ehrmann

 

By

Hazel Speed

According to latest news, pigtails found in a dirty tobacco tin are to be DNA tested to ascertain if they are those of some of the mutineers associated with the story of Captain Bligh.

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Poetry

By

Ngozi Olivia Osuoha

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Photography, who sees what…cascading short thoughts

Bayo Omoboriowo

 

By

Fatimah Bakare-Dickson

 

Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving. What you have caught on film is captured forever… it remembers little things, long after you have forgotten everything – Aaron Siskind

In marking the world photography day, which was marked a few days ago, I decided not only to write about photography one of my passions, gift and field of study, but to use the opportunity to vent…

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Virtual Reality

Howard Rose

 

By

Hazel Speed

In recent weeks, news is emerging which tells us that the realm of Virtual Reality is now a tool which can be used to ease suffering.

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The Good Politician

Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

 

By

Hazel Speed

Hopefully this heading has caught your attention, mostly, no doubt, by its contradiction in terms many would say.

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Leaders that cannot cook, cannot pray, and cannot plan

By

Prince Charles Dickson

 

How do you make God laugh? Tell Him of any plans by Nigerian leaders

It’s funny really, the things that bother us as people. To the fact that we were once the happiest people; add that to, the fact we are equally in the top tier of the most religious people on earth, we also have a high level of endurance and persistence, perseverance and patience.

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Poetry

Chad Hipolito

 

By

Penn Kemp

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Children’s Cinema in Iran

Children of Heaven Majid Majidi

‘Children of Heaven’, Majid Majidi

 

By

Narges Kharghani

 

Cinema is dead of winter! The cinema that has gone through hibernation

 

It’s a common trend in the world of cinema that children’s cinema has the best-selling films. In fact children’s films topped the box office in most countries. But it seems it’s different in Iran.

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Poetry

Robert Frank

 

By

Michael Marrotti

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The Last Overlapping Generations Of The 20th Century

Roger Mayne

 

By

Hazel Speed

Having listened to a broadcast discussion about pensioners of today being the first in history not to have worked until they dropped, but are now enjoying the fruits of their labours while most probably still going to live for another 20-30 years, I was intrigued to digest more of the conversation.

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